Café taps current affairs

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Have you been wrongly accused?

How do you respond in those situations?

These are a few of the questions which guided the conversation during the “Wrongly Accused: A Rush to Judgment” video at this week’s Lifetree Café at Peace Lutheran Church, 5675 Field St., Arvada, CO.

Based in Loveland, the Lifetree Café organization presents modern faith and life-related issues weekly, via a video interview, in a safe, comfortable coffeehouse environment, bringing people together to discuss such topics and share their stories, across the country.

“I come because it has interesting, God-centered, topics that are fresh and relevant,” said Evie Cullman, Lifetree Café attendee and Peace Lutheran Church member.

A little over a year ago, Polly Wegner, director of discipleship at Peace Lutheran Church, began hosting a Lifetree Café gathering in Arvada as a way to reach the community outside of her church.

“I had heard about it, and thought it’s reaching a different demographic our church may not reach otherwise,” Wegner said, “It’s spiritual, but it’s open and you’re welcome, just as you are.”

Each week, around 10-20 people gather at one of two Lifetree Café’s offered Tuesday’s at Peace Lutheran Church to watch a free video presentation. The videos consist of interviews with people throughout the world who are confronting different issues facing society today.

Throughout each presentation, café guests sit, four to a table, and watch that week’s video. The presentation bounces between video and commentary, asking specific questions to attendees to help guide conversation among tablemates.

“I like to think about these events, and this is a safe place where conversation is guided, that helps us get way deep right away,” Wegner said.

From hoarding, being wrongly accused to interviews on the paranormal and Christmas baking, Lifetree Café discusses relevant issues and offers attendees a place to share opinions, ideas and build relationships with others who attend.

“I’ve met so many people I can give a high-five or a hello to,” Cullman said. “It’s definitely a great way to get to know someone more than a ‘Hi, hey how’s the weather?”