Erik Newton found guilty of murder

Life in prison for “Execution-style” killing near Arvada

Staff report
Posted 7/31/18

A Jefferson County jury deliberated four hours on July 17 before finding Erik Jamal Newton, 23, guilty of the murder of Zachary Greenstreet in June, 2016. On June 17, 2016 Newton shot and killed …

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Erik Newton found guilty of murder

Life in prison for “Execution-style” killing near Arvada

Posted

A Jefferson County jury deliberated four hours on July 17 before finding Erik Jamal Newton, 23, guilty of the murder of Zachary Greenstreet in June, 2016.

On June 17, 2016 Newton shot and killed 29-year-old Greenstreet in his driveway as he returned home from his father’s house. He was shot six times at close range. Prosecutors described this as an “execution-style” killing.

A year prior to the murder, Newton had posted inappropriate content on social media about Greenstreet’s girlfriend. Friends and family of the woman confronted Newton about the post and insults were exchanged. Newton was blocked and unfriended to prevent further contact on social media. There was no further contact of any kind between the parties until the murder.

The jury heard testimony that Newton did not target Greenstreet, specifically, but that he went to the house in unincorporated Jefferson County outside Arvada expecting either Greenstreet, his girlfriend, or the girlfriend’s son to be there.

Newton’s defense was that he had a mental condition which prevented him from deliberately committing the murder, despite the findings of a court appointed psychiatrist. Following his evaluation, the doctor testified that it was his conclusion that Newton was malingering (faking or exaggerating symptoms).

The jury found Newton guilty of first degree murder and tampering with physical evidence.

He was sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole.

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