Five questions with Moni Piz Wilson

President of Grandma’s Frozen Noodles, Hope House board member

Posted 11/15/17

What’s the story behind Grandma’s Frozen Noodles?

We’ve been around since 1961. We saw a niche that needed to be filled in the market and back then the grocery world was a whole different animal. That was back when the first King Soopers …

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Five questions with Moni Piz Wilson

President of Grandma’s Frozen Noodles, Hope House board member

Posted

What’s the story behind Grandma’s Frozen Noodles?

We’ve been around since 1961. We saw a niche that needed to be filled in the market and back then the grocery world was a whole different animal. That was back when the first King Soopers was opened up here in Arvada and so selling groceries was a whole lot easier. But we had a great product that people loved and got into the local grocery. Now, 50-some-odd years later, we’re still doing it. We have a very clean product, it has what they call a clean label — just flower, eggs and water, a little bit of salt. It’s just a great staple. We sell it in the whole western half of the U.S., over 20 states. And we’re currently branching into the smaller markets, like Natural Grocers and Sprouts.

Can you talk about how you got involved in the business and the family aspect of it?

My former husband’s father started the business and when we were married, we bought it from him. I’ve been running the business since 2002. I love that we’re a family business. My niece’s husband works here as the director of sales and marketing. My former husband's cousin is the plant manager. We’re very much a family organization. When people come to work here they don’t leave. We have a really great crew. We are a family here.

How has food played a role in your life?

Food to me is what brings people together. Everyone needs to eat. I’ve actually brought food in other things I do. I’m very involved in the community, and I’ve served on several boards. One board I sat on, things were a little contentious between the county and the cities and different members.

And I started thinking we should have food at these meetings because if everyone can show up and have a couple bites first, then we can all sit down at the table and be a little closer in what we need to discuss. So, I find it a really great negotiating table if there’s food.

You’re on the board for Hope House. Can you talk about that?

Hope House of Colorado is a residential and educational teen mom organization. I love them so much. I found out about them because I ended up with these big baby baskets that I got at a silent auction and I didn’t have any grandkids, so I was looking to donate them. I dropped them off, took a tour and I loved what they were doing. Their success rate is amazing. I love watching these teen moms thrive. I admire the girls so much for what they are able to accomplish and how hard they work. I was asked to be on the board four years ago and I’m very honored to be able to sit on that board.

Why are you devoted to the Hope House cause?

I love that it’s a faith-based organization. I love that they help the girls see who they are in God’s eyes. If you have that as your foundation it can only go up from there. And I love watching the girls reach self sufficiency and different steps along the way. They take parenting classes, healthy relationship classes. They learn so much while they’re there. One of my favorite parts is watching them succeed and move out into the world. They still want to stay connected with Hope House and the offer a hand back, mentor other teen moms. Which I think is so helpful, because those teen moms can look at people like me all day and have no connection, but when they have a five-year-older mom saying, “I did it, you can do too.” I love that. To me, it points to what a successful organization it is.

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