Red Rocks Community College

RRCC teaches managerial skills to keep employees safe

RMEC offers training to employees in seven states

Posted 10/24/17

A person can have all the technical training necessary to be successful on a job site, but training to be a good boss is something most don’t receive.

“You might be an awesome welder on Friday and then have to be a boss on Monday,” said …

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Red Rocks Community College

RRCC teaches managerial skills to keep employees safe

RMEC offers training to employees in seven states

Posted

A person can have all the technical training necessary to be successful on a job site, but training to be a good boss is something most don’t receive.

“You might be an awesome welder on Friday and then have to be a boss on Monday,” said Joan Smith, executive director of the Rocky Mountain Education Center (RMEC), the continuing education division of Red Rocks Community College. “On the job site, people have to step into managerial roles, but they never learned how to manage people.”

For the third year, the education center is offering a one-day experiential training program to help those who need to train workers to be safe on a job site, thanks to $155,000 from the United States Department of Labor’s Susan Harwood Grant Program.

For the past two years, the center has focused on the oil and gas industry, but this year’s training program will focus on construction site safety, particularly fall prevention.

“This kind of safety emphasis is a good focus to have,” said Arnulfo Torrez, a salesperson in the oil and gas industry who works all over the country, who took the course a year ago. “When employees are able to identify hazards, that’s a benefit to everyone.”

The construction training program is available and both English and Spanish, and available to not just Colorado residents, but also Utah, Montana, North and South Dakota, Wyoming, Texas and Arkansas.

And, thanks to the Susan Harwood grant, the program is free to employees, who then turn around and train workers at the job site.

“What always surprises people is how much the communication skills they learn apply to family and personal life,” Smith added. “These skills are transferable to a lot of different fields.”

Torrez has seen firsthand the benefit this kind of knowledge can bring in the field, which is why he recommends people take the course.

“When you take short cuts in the field, especially in industries like oil and gas, people can get hurt,” he said. “It’s about being a leader.”

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