education

Amanda Stevens enters Jeffco school board race

Jeffco mom announces run

Posted 5/21/15

Former teacher and Jeffco mom Amanda Stevens is running for the District 4 school board seat, and said she is looking to bring a neutral voice and collaboration to the board table.

District 4 includes Edgewater, Lakewood and most of …

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education

Amanda Stevens enters Jeffco school board race

Jeffco mom announces run

Posted

Former teacher and Jeffco mom Amanda Stevens is running for the District 4 school board seat, and said she is looking to bring a neutral voice and collaboration to the board table.

District 4 includes Edgewater, Lakewood and most of unincorporated southern Jeffco.

“When I started to see some dominoes fall, I started to pay attention, to attend board meetings, to offer public comment,” she said. “Anyone who offers to serve on a board of education is doing thankless work, uncompensated work, hard and worthy work — and I appreciated that I could have a voice in that process, and now I'm looking for a bigger voice to speak on behalf of our students, families and our teachers.”

Why she is in the news:

A Colorado native, Stevens grew up attending Jeffco schools. While she was an honor student, Stevens felt as though she wouldn't make it, and dropped out of high school. This difficult decision, she said, was one of the defining moments in her life.

“I was a strong student … but I was also disconnected,” she said, “I needed someone who could tell me what I'd be missing and that I would be missed — I didn't have that — but it all worked out later in life because it motivated me to become a teacher.”

After obtaining her GED, Stevens became a high school and middle school teacher and taught in impoverished schools in Chicago, Illinois and Sheridan,Colorado. Moving back to Jeffco to raise a family, Stevens became a stay-at-home mom, diving into the programs and policies that shaped her and will shape her children's education.

Brings to the table:

With her education background, Stevens also has been active in her children's schools and served as a member of their School Accountability Committee for years.

Stevens, an unaffiliated voter, said she brings a new perspective to the table, and is looking forward to seeing and evaluating issues through all sides, cooperating with all views around the table.

“Cooperation and the ability to listen and move forward in compromise matters greatly, especially at a time when people feel more divided and afraid,” she said.

Along with her perspective, Stevens cites her conciliatory nature as both a strength and a weakness.

“I would rather face obstacles together, and occasionally politics is adversarial, and that will be a new challenge for me,” she said. “I hope it means I will be good at bridge building, but I recognize it means I'll have to learn to take on advocacy in a new way when essentials are at risk.”

Hobbies and other interests: 
Along with her passion for K-12 education, Stevens is passionate about skiing, hiking, running marathons, reading and spending time with her husband, Gene, and their two kids.

In her own words:

“This for me is not about politics — it's about Jeffco and Jeffco's kids.”

“Right now I want to see kids prioritized, rather than agendas and ideologies or even personality conflicts. I can't afford to have my kids' schools become a battleground for anyone, so I want to make sure we look for ways to work together and do our best by them.”

“I had the time to read, to volunteer tutor and to dig deeper into some of the policies that impact what some of my classroom experience was like as a teacher and even as a student. I'm motivated now to say that I think the way forward for our kids is to cooperate, to listen to each other. To tell the stories about what it's like for kids and families to go through the process and education of 21st-century competitiveness — which is one intimidating demand.”

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