Avilla developer NexMetro sets sights on McIntyre

Developer no longer considering North Table Mountain site

Paul Albani-Burgio
palbaniburgio@coloradocommunitymedia.com
Posted 3/3/21

An Arizona-based developer has abandoned its proposal to construct 236 rentable homes on the north flank of North Table Mountain. Instead, is now exploring the possibility of locating a small rental …

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Avilla developer NexMetro sets sights on McIntyre

Developer no longer considering North Table Mountain site

Posted

An Arizona-based developer has abandoned its proposal to construct 236 rentable homes on the north flank of North Table Mountain. Instead, is now exploring the possibility of locating a small rental community at the intersection of West 54th Avenue and McIntyre Street.

That was one of the takeaways from an hours-long meeting on Jan. 26, at which representatives of the developer, Avilla Homes parent company NexMetro Communities, introduced their concept for that new community and answered questions from a largely oppositional public.

“With it not being an arterial road and with it not having some of the buffers we look for in this case we made the decision that it is probably better to let [the owners] pursue other avenues at this time and for us to move away from that project as well,” said Reed Ruck, the Denver managing partner of NexMetro Communities.

The new proposal,168 homes on 17.2 acres just east of McIntyre Street, maintains many of the elements from Nexmetro’s previous North Table Mountain proposal albeit with a more accessible location. Reed said the proposal will still aim to address Golden’s shortage of missing” middle housing,” which refers to housing that is neither a purchased single-family home or an apartment or townhouse but something that combines elements of both.

Per the proposal, the target market for the houses would be roughly split between older residents who have lived in the community for a long time but are looking to downsize and give up the burdens of home ownership and younger residents who are not yet ready to purchase their own home.

Rezone required

If NexMetro chooses to move forward with the 54th and McIntyre site, the next step would be to submit an application to rezone the property, county planning case manager Alicia Halberg said.

The property will need to be rezoned because the current zoning allows for a maximum of one housing unit per acre under the county comprehensive plan.

However, Reed argued that their proposal is worth consideration because the “comprehensive) plan was developed some time ago” and NexMetro is proposing to bring housing to an arterial location.

“Our units are significantly smaller than single family homes and involve significantly less people and significantly less traffic than a common single-family home community,” said Reed.

Reed also said that while it is early in the process of analyzing the potential project, WestMetro would be looking at rents starting at about $1,500 for a one-bedroom up to $2,600 for a three-bedroom.

Although questions focused on issues ranging from the traffic the development would create to the impact on area wildlife, many were focused on the impact the development, which would consist of connected patio homes, would have on the character of the still semi-rural Fairmount area.

“The actual design of the homes are craftsman in nature and fit in with architecture I think that you would find in the surrounding area,” said Tyler Elick, a development manager for NexMetro. “I think setting back some of the homes from the Farmer’s Highline Canal fits into that as well.”

The Farmer’s Highline Canal is located on the eastern side of the property. Elick mentioned locating such amenities as a dog park and walking path along the canal, although some homes would still be adjacent to it.

During the meeting, Halberg also took a question concerned about the amount of proposed development in the McIntyre area more generally.

“We know that there are a lot of proposals in the area but we take each one through that prescribed process and lookat what its proposing with the rezoning, what are the impacts, is it compatible, does it fit into the community,” she said.

Halberg also acknowledged that the feedback she had received about the project had been overwhelmingly negative, with only three of the roughly 75 comments she had received in favor of the project.

She said the best way to express opposition would be to make comments to the county planning and zoning department, although she recommended waiting to see whether a formal rezoning application is filed as there is currently nothing to comment on.

“Certainly, if you’re concerned talk with your neighbors, talked with your friends, get organized and stay connected,” she said. “That way if they choose to move forward you’ll be in the know with what is going on with the case and can provide comment as soon as those applications come in.”

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