My name is... Corrie Francis

Mrs. Arvada 2019, mom, wish granter

Posted 3/20/19

Being a mom, wife I am a mom of two. I have a little boy, Jackson who is gonna turn 10 soon and a 6- year-old daughter Alivia. I’ve lived in Colorado this time around for almost six years. I lived …

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My name is... Corrie Francis

Mrs. Arvada 2019, mom, wish granter

Posted

Being a mom, wife

I am a mom of two. I have a little boy, Jackson who is gonna turn 10 soon and a 6- year-old daughter Alivia. I’ve lived in Colorado this time around for almost six years. I lived here previously for five years, but moved away for a while. I’ve been married for going on 15 years to my husband, Greg, who is a Colorado native. We met in Mexico when we were in college — different colleges. I work full-time for Wells Fargo as a national business initiative consultant.

Getting into pageants

I’ve been doing pageants now for over 20 years. I got into them as a fluke. I was 15 and I never wore make up. I didn’t wear high heels or pantyhose. But I grew up dancing, so I was comfortable being on stage.

Our family had a local friend who ran a small pageant in my hometown in Indiana and they needed one more girl to compete. So, she asked me. When she did, my mom gave her this look and started laughing. As a 15-year-old, knowing I was awkward, that hurt a lot. But if you tell me I can’t something, that’s when I’m going to prove you wrong. I won that pageant. I was shocked to say the least. But I saw that I really did grow as an individual and that sparked an interest in me. Then I learned about scholarship pageants. I was going to be the first in my family to attend college, and pageants were a way to diminish that cost burden for my family. I went on to be Miss Arizona in 2003 and Mrs. Arizona in 2010. It’s so much more than getting on stage and looking pretty.

Building confidence

When we moved back to Colorado, I was working from home and feeling isolated. I felt that I wasn’t having the opportunity to expand my social circle. I wanted to do something that would get me out and meet people. Having coached many contestants in pageants in the past, it started to intrigue me to compete again. A lot of coaching is just helping women realize their own self confidence. Women, we tend to doubt ourselves at times and it’s just building them up and telling them they’ve got this. Then when they go on stage that confidence shines thought.

Competing in Mrs. Colorado

This is now my fourth year competing in the Mrs. Colorado State Pageant. There are so many different things that keep me coming back. Ultimately, it comes down to is it’s an opportunity to do something that excited me, but at the same time I am able to make a huge impact in my community.

My kids are also learning so many valuable life lessons by watching me, that I don’t know if I could articulate to them. That’s been my main driver — allowing my kids to see what working hard, commitment and community involvement means. And since I haven’t won Mrs. Colorado yet, they’ve also learned the importance of perseverance and putting you best foot forward. It teaches them that winning is not everything.

Volunteering with Make-a-Wish

I’m a Make-a-Wish wish granter. I’ve been volunteering four years now. Originally, I got involved because when I was 12, a cousin of mine had cancer and we were part of her wish.

We had moved away and she wanted to see us. So, Make-a-Wish flew my family across the country. We wouldn’t have been able to do that if it wasn’t for the organization. I remember being touched by everything they did to try to make her wish come true even though she was in a coma at that time.

Looking for ways to get involved and being a mom, I wanted to do something with kids, so I went through wish granter training. I have had so much fun meeting kids and helping to make their wish come true.

Advocating for the terminally ill

I work with another organization as well that is similar called Hope Kids. It has a similar philosophy of providing experiences to kids that will last a lifetime. But they look at the whole family unit and more than one event.

A lot of my community involvement right now focuses on organizations that support terminally ill kids. My area of outreach for the pageant is supporting the terminally ill and their families.

My father is terminally ill. That’s one reason why I continue to compete. I want to try to increase awareness of support to individuals. Terminal illness is something that we will all be touched by at some point in our life.

If you have a suggestion for My Name Is, contact Shanna Fortier at sfortier@coloradocommunitymedia.com.

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