Court of Appeals rules against `$30 land deal' development plan

Decision came May 14

Staff report
Posted 5/19/20

In a May 14 decision, the Colorado Court of Appeals overturned city council's approval of the Olde Town Residences project, associated with what is known as the “$30 land deal,” Developer …

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Court of Appeals rules against `$30 land deal' development plan

Decision came May 14

Posted

In a May 14 decision, the Colorado Court of Appeals overturned city council's approval of the Olde Town Residences project, associated with what is known as the “$30 land deal.”

Developer Trammell Crow planned the project, a six-story building including a parking garage and hundreds of apartments at 5565 Wadsworth Blvd.

The $30 land deal refers to the sale of the property on which the building is proposed to be built, with a plan that the Arvada Urban Renewal Authority would sell the land to Trammell Crow for $30.

At the time the plan was considered, the land was valued by the Jefferson County Assessor at almost $6 million, said the release.

In January 2018, city council rejected Trammell Crow's preliminary development plan. But in March 2018, the council approved the plan, with Arvada for All the People soon claiming that the two-month turnaround went against Arvada law.

In March 2019, the case went to court, with the Jefferson County District Court ruling against community group Arvada for All the People.

On May 14, the Court of Appeals upheld part of the district court's ruling that the city did not violate open meeting law. But it also reversed part of the decision, stating that Arvada misinterpreted its land development code and the approval of the project must be overturned.

Now that the case has been appealed and the court has ruled in favor of the grassroots group, “the developer will have to start the development approval process as a new application,” a statement by Arvada for All the Peoples stated. “The city council's March 2018 approval is void.”

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