Electric Cherry hosts Record Store Day celebration in Olde Town Arvada

Olde Town record store features Record Store Day exclusives from Olivia Rodrigo, Green Day, Dee-Lite

Rylee Dunn
rdunn@coloradocommunitymedia.com
Posted 4/24/22

After missing out on the occasion during its first two years of business, Electric Cherry, a record store in Olde Town Arvada, was finally able to celebrate Record Store Day this year.

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Electric Cherry hosts Record Store Day celebration in Olde Town Arvada

Olde Town record store features Record Store Day exclusives from Olivia Rodrigo, Green Day, Dee-Lite

Posted

After missing out on the occasion during its first two years of business, Electric Cherry, a record store in Olde Town Arvada, was finally able to celebrate Record Store Day this year.

On April 23, the shop hosted its first ever Record Store Day celebration, featuring RSD exclusives from Olivia Rodrigo, Green Day and others along with free pizza and a general sale.

Record Store Day is an annual event that began in 2007 to celebrate the culture of independent record stores. Artists who participate typically release special RSD editions of vinyl’s — this year’s slate includes special issues from David Bowie and Mariah Carey.

Electric Cherry Owner and Founder Ally Skiba said that her shop would be featuring 150 new RSD exclusives, and 200 used original press records donated by locals who patronize her shop. All goods in the shop were 10% off to celebrate the occasion, and Skiba provided pizza to the first customers who visited during record store day.

Skiba said that although Electric Cherry features other goods — the shop features wares made by local artists and artisans curated by Skiba — records are the core of the shop.

“Vinyl is the heartbeat of the shop. Although I have been an artist since I was a kid and I appreciate art — environmental goods and supporting other women – music is truly the ground floor of what’s going on here,” Skiba said.

She added that Record Store Day allows a unique opportunity for independent record stores to stand out and for vinyl enthusiasts to check out unique pressings and releases.

“There’s a huge reason to support indie record stores overall. Every day, we’re battling Amazon, big box shops. We can get a lot more (records) that aren’t mass produced. Record Store Day is a holiday for music lovers. It’s a day for everyone to get together, enjoy music, shop small. There’s always exclusive releases and that’s the point of the holiday,” Skiba said.

Skiba herself is originally from the East Coast and moved to Colorado about six years ago. She opened Electric Cherry in February 2020 — right before the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic.

She said that while she had to make sacrifices in the early days, she’s noticed an uptick in vinyl interest throughout the pandemic.

“I was a vinyl delivery girl for the two months we were mandated to close. I drove around delivering records — never thought I’d have to do that,” Skiba said.

“Due to COVID, vinyl is making a huge resurgence. Which is interesting — starting a business that during a pandemic but also starting a business that I think, ironically, people were interested in a lot,” Skiba continued.

Skiba’s love affair with vinyl can be traced back to her grandfather, who manually pressed records for over 30 years, and her own background as an artist and proximity to the music scene. She said she had a goal to open a record store but called it a “far away dream” until Electric Cherry came to fruition.

“My grandfather and my grandmother, every moment spent with them revolved around learning or expressing myself or appreciating music,” Skiba said. “I had a lot of friends who were in bands — I would do a lot of band photography. I was always immersed in something… art has also done that as well, but music might have come first.”

Skiba said that although she didn’t have any business experience before opening the shop, she relied on expertise shared with her by other women in the industry to make Electric Cherry successful.

“I do feel like paying my dues helped me become an entrepreneur. I didn’t have a business degree — I have a fine arts degree. It really took learning from other women that helped me open this place and teach me about business,” Skiba said.

Her efforts are paying off thus far. Electric Cherry has carved out a niche in Olde Town as the district’s home for all things arts and music and recently celebrated its two-year anniversary. The shop hosts live music throughout the summer, details of which can be found on their Facebook page.

Skiba herself was recently named a Badass Woman of Arvada by the city’s Chamber of Commerce.

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