Electric City keeps vintage audio alive

The shop repairs and sells vintage audio equipment

Posted 1/22/19

The customers at Electric City Repair go there for one thing — quality sounding music. Whether it’s someone who wants their long-owned vintage stereo repaired or a millennial who has discovered …

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Electric City keeps vintage audio alive

The shop repairs and sells vintage audio equipment

Posted

The customers at Electric City Repair go there for one thing — quality sounding music. Whether it’s someone who wants their long-owned vintage stereo repaired or a millennial who has discovered vinyl, Eric Johnson’s shop is where to go.

“When I discovered vintage audio, how good it sounds and how great it is to work on, that’s where I wanted to go with my work, and that’s what I did,” Johnson said.

Before opening his shop two years ago near the Westminster, Arvadan, Johnson worked repairing computers, copy machines and other equipment that keeps the business world running. Now, he spends his time repairing pre-1980 stereo equipment — which his shop specialized in.

“Stereo components made during the Vietnam era are really popular,” Johnson said. “They sound really good, they’re easy to service and they are collectable — there’s a market for it these days.”

Johnson’s ability to repair everything from World War II-era radios, to fancy European vintage turn tables, is what brought Arvada resident Joe Seehusen to the store.

“I take them every old dusty piece I acquire, whether it be turntables, reel to reel, speakers or cassette players,” Seehusen said. “They get it running perfectly for me. Their expertise allows me — and my neighbors — to listen to all my favorite genres the way they were meant to be listened to.”

The space that is now home to Electric City used to a pawn shop and when Johnson took over, there were still things lying around. Now, old jewelry cases have been converted to hold used vinyl records for sale. Customers can also find cassette tapes, 8-track tapes and reel to reel tapes.

“We’re just all about saving the vintage audio,” Johnson said. `Keeping it playing and keeping it out of the junk yard and landfills.”

According to the most recept report from Nielsen — an information, data and measurement company — Vinyl record sales continued to soar in 2018, up 15 percent over the same period last year. It was the 13th consecutive year that vinyl sales continued to rise.

On Record Store Day — scheduled for April 13 this year — Electric City puts out a table of records for a free give away.

“This is the type of business you feel good supporting,” Seehusen said. “But watch out, it’s an addicting hobby.”

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