Forming a pipeline for future talent

Mines and Lockheed Martin host event to inspire potential aerospace engineers

Posted 2/26/19

Aerospace is a worldwide endeavor. “It is one thing that unites the nation, and it unites the world,” said Paul Anderson, the Orion program director with Lockheed Martin. “And it even goes …

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Forming a pipeline for future talent

Mines and Lockheed Martin host event to inspire potential aerospace engineers

Posted

Aerospace is a worldwide endeavor.

“It is one thing that unites the nation, and it unites the world,” said Paul Anderson, the Orion program director with Lockheed Martin. “And it even goes beyond that.”

On Feb. 19, as part of National Engineers Week, Feb. 18-22, Lockheed Martin partnered with the Colorado School of Mines to bring together Lockheed Martin’s aerospace engineers, current Mines students and high school seniors from across the state.

About 20 Lockheed Martin engineers — all Mines alumni — participated in the event, and about 25 high schoolers — all who have been accepted to Mines — attended the event.

The high school students received lab tours on Mines campus where they got to see graduate students at work, and an opportunity to “talk shop” during a mentoring luncheon with the Lockheed Martin engineers, said Cynthia Howell, research faculty at Mines with the critical materials institute.

“They got the whole spectrum,” Howell said. “What’s offered at Mines, and where they can go with a degree from Mines. This was an opportunity for us to wow them.”

The event also included a parent tract so parents could learn about Mines and have their questions answered, Howell said.

This year was the seventh year for the event to happen, and it has always been a joint effort between Mines and Lockheed Martin.

Mines’ partnerships with industry enrich the school, said Mines President Paul Johnson in his address to the high schoolers. And in turn, he said, employers commend Mines’ graduates.

“We have always been a producer of outstanding engineers,” Johnson said to the students.

He added that the number one thing employers say about Mines graduates is that “they are the best team players.” This is followed by Mines graduates accomplish their tasks and that they are resilient and can overcome challenges, Johnson said to the students.

During the mentoring luncheon, the high schoolers, current Mines students and Lockheed Martin engineers chatted in small, rotating groups to share stories — the experience of attending Mines and what the aerospace engineers do at Lockheed Martin, for example.

Anderson referred to the event as a pipeline for future talent. It’s an opportunity to get the best and brightest students, first, attracted to Mines, Anderson said, and then, get them interested in aerospace and excited for a potential future career in the field.

And “the Lockheed Martin engineers will go back to work completely energized,” Anderson said. “For them to have the opportunity to influence the future is really energizing.”

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