Kids, adults alike join West Arvada Orthodontics for windy, but fun-filled afternoon of painting

Michael Hicks
mhicks@coloradocommunitymedia.com
Posted 2/15/21

One painting shows the daytime, while the other is at night. Yet both of Kenley Rieter’s mountain landscape artwork is prominently displayed, along with one created by her mom, Amanda, on the …

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Kids, adults alike join West Arvada Orthodontics for windy, but fun-filled afternoon of painting

Posted

One painting shows the daytime, while the other is at night. Yet both of Kenley Rieter’s mountain landscape artwork is prominently displayed, along with one created by her mom, Amanda, on the counter at West Arvada Orthodontics.

From Saturday’s outdoor painting club to walking, hiking and biking clubs, even a science night in non-pandemic times, West Arvada Orthodontics, in particular Dr. Jennifer and Ronen Friedman, is all about community.

“We like to be involved and give back to the community, especially during COVID when everybody is having social isolation. That’s why we do this,” Jennifer Friedman said.

Ronen Friedman, the CEO for West Arvada Orthodontics, said there were two purposes in mind when the company started hosting events, such as the painting club, a year and a half ago: to bring the community together and to provide a virtual outlet for people who couldn’t leave their home, be it because of a traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury or the like.

That was before the COVID-19 pandemic struck.

“It’s a way for them to interact, to have that community feeling,” he said. “It’s important.”

If anyone needs any more evidence of their caring nature all one has to do is visit their office in the Candelas community. It is tailor-made catered to patients with autism or neurological issues.

From the changing colors of the ceiling lights for a calming atmosphere to plants, a massage chair and colored circular patterns on the floor, it’s all there to provide visual stimuli for the patients.

“We believe in educating the community as well,” Jennifer Friedman said. “It’s why we have a microscope in the kids’ area as opposed to an iPad. … Another goal of our office is to be relaxing. It’s designed to accommodate those with neurological disorders, autism and brain injuries.”

Their efforts hasn’t gone unnoticed.

“They are compassionate and kind. … They really have a great heart to help people of all walks of life,” said fellow doctor Jennina Townsend. “I really appreciate what they’ve done.”

Amanda Reiter, a realtor and Candelas resident, has been actively involved in the painting club. She’s hopeful to join in, when time allows, on the biking and/or hiking club as well.

Be it getting her daughter out and active or herself, she recognizes the effort the Friedman put in to connect with their neighbors.

“For anybody who knows them, the first thing that they notice about them is that they care about their community,” Amanda Rieter said. “Even before this building was opened, they were getting involved, finding ways to help the community.”

Members of upwards of five families — the maximum they were allowed due to COVID-19 safety concerns — took part in Saturday’s painting club before windy weather conditions shortened the afternoon. Still, those who attended enjoyed the activity and the camaraderie.

“A lot of businesses say that they care about their community, that they’re part of the community. But just like the painting today, they’re able to come up with ways to have creative fun for members of the community to do at a time, let’s be honest, where we all need something fun and creative to do,” Amanda Rieter said.

Especially given the trials and tribulations that the last year has created.

“Before the COVID pandemic, I think this allowed us to take that for granted,” Ronen Friedman said. “I think now everybody understands the importance of being able to interact.”

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