Land Development Code unanimously adopted by city council

Two-plus-years process was joint effort of city team and community

Staff report
Posted 6/3/20

After a process that lasted more than two years, Arvada has adopted the latest version of its Land Development Code or LDC, which has not been comprehensively reviewed and updated since 2008. The …

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Land Development Code unanimously adopted by city council

Two-plus-years process was joint effort of city team and community

Posted

After a process that lasted more than two years, Arvada has adopted the latest version of its Land Development Code or LDC, which has not been comprehensively reviewed and updated since 2008.

The plan lays out guidelines for future developments, with the city choosing to implement updates as part of the Arvada Comprehensive Plan, adopted back in 2014.

“The process to update and modernize the LDC was a huge undertaking,” said Ryan Stachelski, the city’s community and economic development director. “This two-and-a-half-years process was a collaboration with the community to help implement its vision for how Arvada should look and feel as things develop over the next 20 years.”

The code’s several updates include the creation of mixed-use zoning districts, which Arvada’s previous code did not specify, Arvada planning manager Rob Smetana said in a previous interview.

City council unanimously approved the new LDC on May 18. In a series of different votes, the majority of council also voted to amend the code to modify the appeals process for administrative cases, allowing for only city council review if those cases are appealed; revise language to clarify a section of the code; and change the zoning for a handful of properties.

With the vote, councilmembers like Bob Fifer praised all who were involved for their efforts.

“The staff, the team and the citizens have done a fabulous job of getting this fine-tuned,” he said.

Stachelski echoed the sentiment, saying the council’s unanimous approval is a sign that the plan represents the community’s shared values.

“I believe that this LDC will be held as a best practice for years to come,” he said, “and continue to help Arvada stand apart as a forward-thinking community.”   

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