Letter: Let’s do some critical thinking about the air quality guest column

Posted 1/3/23

By EPA’s own data, since 1980, carbon monoxide, lead, nitrogen dioxide, and sulphur dioxide levels have dropped an average of 84 percent. Even the EPA’s new villain, ozone, has dropped 29% in the same time period.

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

Username
Password
Log in

Don't have an ID?


Print subscribers

If you're a print subscriber, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one.

Non-subscribers

Click here to see your options for becoming a subscriber.

If you made a voluntary contribution in 2022-2023 of $50 or more, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one at no additional charge. VIP Digital Access includes access to all websites and online content.


Our print publications are advertiser supported. For those wishing to access our content online, we have implemented a small charge so we may continue to provide our valued readers and community with unique, high quality local content. Thank you for supporting your local newspaper.

Letter: Let’s do some critical thinking about the air quality guest column

Posted

By EPA’s own data, since 1980, carbon monoxide, lead, nitrogen dioxide, and sulphur dioxide levels have dropped an average of 84 percent. Even the EPA’s new villain, ozone, has dropped 29% in the same time period. One has to ask, since air pollution has dropped so dramatically since 1980, why are asthma cases increasing? Cynically, you could say there is an inverse relationship between asthma and air pollution. I don’t think this is the case. More likely it appears that other factors, such as the redefinition of what asthma is, are more important than air pollution.

The columnist also ties “our increasingly ferocious and frequent wildfire season” with decreasing air quality. The truth is the EPA says air quality is improving and while 50 million acres burned per year in the 1930s it is now about 10 million acres per year. This data is not hard to find even though governmental officials have removed wild fire burn date prior to 1983 from official websites.

We are reaching the point of diminishing return when it comes to air quality improvement, After all, the EPA will always be able to designate a new substance as dangerous or reduce the acceptable level of existing pollutants forever and demand more controls.

Let’s seek the truth.

Kelly Sheehan, Arvada

Arvada, pollution, air quality, EPA, letter to the editor

Comments

Our Papers

Ad blocker detected

We have noticed you are using an ad blocking plugin in your browser.

The revenue we receive from our advertisers helps make this site possible. We request you whitelist our site.