Letter to the editor: Falling short of the ideal

Posted 2/7/19

A letter in the Jan. 17 edition called “Freedom of the Press” as something where “journalists accept to gather, confirm, reconfirm, and report on factual information that is vetted by a …

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Letter to the editor: Falling short of the ideal

Posted

A letter in the Jan. 17 edition called “Freedom of the Press” as something where “journalists accept to gather, confirm, reconfirm, and report on factual information that is vetted by a responsible editorial board.” I agree this was the previous American journalistic way our First Amendment created. But it no longer transpires as such to audiences. The idea that today’s press could be “held civilly liable for inaccuracies and criminally responsible for willful untruths,” and that “they do not deal in opinions,” was proven wholly erroneous during the Dr. King weekend with the Catholic schoolboy story. As most of our national media offered opinions, false reports, panels of “if this is true” journalists in representing Fake News of incidents or information, media organizations refused to publish retractions nor openly admit errors.
Why is our national news media today agenda driven? They do not wait for confirmations or official statements, treating them as unnecessary for the sake of expediency. News outlets all enticed to rush to similar judgments epitomizes these heresies.

Gary Scofield,
Arvada

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