Letter to the editor: Next steps for COLEG

Posted 6/3/20

 

As a candidate for County Commissioner, one of my top priorities is a flourishing environment for Jefferson County businesses. Little did I know when I made that commitment that our …

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Letter to the editor: Next steps for COLEG

Posted
 
As a candidate for County Commissioner, one of my top priorities is a flourishing environment for Jefferson County businesses. Little did I know when I made that commitment that our businesses, and their employees, would be hit so hard, so fast. The pandemic threw a sucker punch that might be tough to recover from.
There are 611,000 small businesses in Colorado employing 1.1m people; 24 percent are two months, or less, away from permanent closure; 11 percent less than one month away from going out of business. (U.S. Chamber)
It’s too late to argue the merits of mandates that forced the closure of many — that’s water under the bridge. Now it’s time to look at what we can do to help our business community recover. The first step is to do no further harm.
As the Legislature reconvenes, several new bills would shift financial burden from government to businesses. Among them a COVID -19 related Worker’s Comp provision that would result in higher insurance rates for employers; mandated sick leave; whistle blower 90-day job protection for employees claiming their employer isn’t taking appropriate safety precautions; and with the Unemployment Trust Fund being depleted, the implementation of a solvency surcharge paid for, you guessed it, by businesses.
This is a difficult time to be in business. Most will struggle to survive. Some will never recover. Now isn’t the time to place more of a burden on our business community. I urge the Legislature to help our business community, not harm it.
Joni Inman,
Golden

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