Letter to the editor: Not so easy to erase debt

Posted 9/25/19

And just how might the local realtor, who writes a weekly ‘infomercial’ for his agency in several local newspapers or inserts, propose to pay for his proposal (9/19) to cancel all college student …

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

Username
Password
Log in

Don't have an ID?


Print subscribers

If you're a print subscriber, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one.

Non-subscribers

Click here to see your options for becoming a subscriber.

If you made a voluntary contribution of $25 or more in Nov. 2018-2019, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one at no additional charge. VIP Digital Access Includes access to all websites


Our print publications are advertiser supported. For those wishing to access our content online, we have implemented a small charge so we may continue to provide our valued readers and community with unique, high quality local content. Thank you for supporting your local newspaper.

Letter to the editor: Not so easy to erase debt

Posted

And just how might the local realtor, who writes a weekly ‘infomercial’ for his agency in several local newspapers or inserts, propose to pay for his proposal (9/19) to cancel all college student loan debt, and thus boosting property sales to hitherto unimagined heights?

Would he propose the creation of $1.5+ trillion (aka funny money) out of nothing by the ever-willing Federal Reserve, thus creating ‘the mother of all’ inflationary bubbles?

Or better, would he advocate defaulting on a requisite amount of our already bloated national debt?

Meanwhile, shouldn’t he and his peers sell their houses, cars, and agencies and give the proceeds to some anonymous ex-students (aka wage slaves) to ease their financial pains?

And what about the situations of those borrowers still in school, or those future college enrollees, born or unborn; would they qualify for this third-party largess?

Might a far better solution be, to get the Federal Government out of the student loan business entirely, thus forcing colleges to severely prune their bloated staffs and ratchet back their costs to more reasonable/attainable levels for their captive student customers?

Russell W Haas,
Golden

Comments

Our Papers

Ad blocker detected

We have noticed you are using an ad blocking plugin in your browser.

The revenue we receive from our advertisers helps make this site possible. We request you whitelist our site.