No charges filed against Arvada Police officer in Olde Town shooting

Officer who shot Golden good Samaritan will not be charged by DA

Ryan Dunn
rdunn@coloradocommunitymedia.com
Posted 11/8/21

The Arvada Police officer who shot Johnny Hurley — recognized as the Good Samaritan in the June 21 Olde Town shooting — has been cleared of legal wrongdoing by First Judicial District Attorney …

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No charges filed against Arvada Police officer in Olde Town shooting

Officer who shot Golden good Samaritan will not be charged by DA

Posted

The Arvada Police officer who shot Johnny Hurley — recognized as the Good Samaritan in the June 21 Olde Town shooting — has been cleared of legal wrongdoing by First Judicial District Attorney Alexis King, as announced at a Nov. 8 press conference.

King identifies APD officer Kraig Brownlow as the officer who shot Hurley as part of a Nov. 8 press conference. She said the decision not to charge Brownlow comes after the findings of a Critical Incident Response Team investigation were presented to King on Sept. 9.

An autopsy completed by the Jefferson County Coroner on Sept. 20 confirmed that Hurley's cause of death was a shot to the pelvis from intermediate range fired by an Arvada Police officer.

Hurley was shot as officers were responding to calls of a shooter in Olde Town Square, which was later determined to be gunman Ronald Troyke, who fatally shot APD Officer Gordon Beelsley before Troyke was shot by Hurley.

King said that more than 3,200 photos and 1,000 pages of reports were reviewed by a collection of local law enforcement agencies including the Jefferson County Sheriff's department and Wheat Ridge Police Department but excluding the Arvada Police, as per CIRT team policy.

MORE: Friend remember Johnny Hurley for his voice, heart

King called Hurley a hero and said he prevented a larger loss of life but said that due to Hurley holding an AR style weapon and a handgun, the officer who shot him acted in a legally justified manner.

“One thing that became evident through our review is that John Hurley acted as a hero,” said King. “Had he survived, we would have praised his bravery for stopping a mass shooting before others were killed.

“This officer had reasonable grounds to believe that John Hurley was another mass shooter and he only had moments to engage him,” King continued. “Therefore, the officer's action to shoot Hurley were legally justified despite the heroic actions of Hurley.”

King then went on to give a detailed timeline of the events of June 21, as determined by the CIRT investigation. She said that three Arvada police officers, including Brownlow, were stationed nearby and responded to gunshots and the panic ensuing in the square.

“Around 1:30 in the afternoon there were three officers assigned to the community outreach team that were stationed in a small office building that was just north of the square. They were finishing up lunch and they heard a series of bangs,” said King. “Bang, bang, bang, pause. Bang, bang, bang, bang.

“They left their office and went down a narrow hallway to the east and looked out a small metal door across from a parking lot. At the southeast corner of the parking lot, they saw a man in black pacing around and they saw him turn and head back east towards the library,” King continued.

King then added that the man in black - presumably Troyke, -- then turned back towards the Square, causing a panic.

“They saw him near a truck, but he didn't get into it. Instead, the man, with an AR-style rifle, dressed all in black turned back towards the Olde Town Arvada Square. All the officers, all three of them knew at that point that they needed to engage this masked gunman. One of them went to the west side of the building, and saw that folks were streaming out of the square in a panic away from the gunman,” King said.

The District Attorney then added that the responding APD officers never got a clear shot of Troyke from their vantage point. Finally, King concluded that the officers shot Hurley because he had picked up Troyke's weapon.

“The second officer went to a window on the south-facing side of the building, planning to engage the shooter through the window, but (Troyke) never appeared. The final officer stayed at the east facing door, and then another round of gunfire. Bang, bang,” said King.

“The officers ran to that east door and as they came around the corner, they knew that their third officer had just shot a man in a red shirt, standing there in the same place that they had seen the man in black. The man in the red shirt was carrying an AR-style rifle and it was on the ground beside him,” King continued.

King conclude the press conference by stating that she hoped the conclusion of her office's investigation into the shooting would provide closure for the families of those involved.

“Working on a case like this is an incredibly humbling experience because we lost two people when a mass shooter brought violence to Arvada. We lost Gordon Beesley and we lost Johnny Hurley,” said King. “This left the city in mourning and knowing the impact of these losses was a profound responsibility. We hope our decision not to file charges will bring a small piece of closure to those connected.”

The Arvada Police Department's Public Information Officer Dave Snelling told the Colorado Sun that Brownlow is still employed by the department but is not working on patrol. Brownlow's LinkedIn states that he has been an APD officer since 2015.

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