Thornton festival offers Native American food and fun

Staff Report
Posted 9/25/19

Organizer Lynne Holman is very clear about the sixth annual Denver American Indian Festival — it’s not a Pow Wow. “A pow wow has a lot of religious connotations,” Holman said. “We didn’t …

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Thornton festival offers Native American food and fun

Posted

Organizer Lynne Holman is very clear about the sixth annual Denver American Indian Festival — it’s not a Pow Wow.

“A pow wow has a lot of religious connotations,” Holman said. “We didn’t want to have any religious connotations in this — just a family event that everyone can come and enjoy without any politics, religion or other things that could interfere.”

The festival runs Sept. 28 and 29 at Thornton’s Good Shepherd United Methodist Church, 3960 E. 128th Ave.

The festival runs from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday and noon to 6 p.m. on Sunday.

The festival features children’s activities, Native American dancers and drummers, traditional food and vendors.

“We have a Navajo group that prepares Indian tacos in fry bread that are the best in Colorado. Just awesome,” Holman, a Cherokee elder said. “Fry bread rises, like a pancake that blows up. They are round but they puff up and then they put layers of meat and beans and tomatoes and lettuce on them. They are wonderful.”

The festival also supports a number of charity groups, including One Nation Walking Together, which collects food and household items for needy families, the Westminster Rotary Club’s Computers for Kids program and the 9HealthFair.

“This year, we’re going to have census people there, because people really need to start thinking about that,” Holman said. “Native Americans, some don’t believe in registering and the Census. So we thought it would be a good idea to bring some information out about how it impacts state and federal money.”

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